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Quebec: Reinventing Ice Cream

What says summer better than ice cream? If you’re looking for some treats to cool you down, but don’t want all the calories or sugar, Quebec has been reinventing ice cream as we know it. After attending the Sial Canada international food show I found some amazing brands you may want to give a try. You can get all the information your need from my article for Organic and Wellness News.

 

 

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Ryerson: An activist community

Ryerson’s equity and inclusion based campus is all thanks to students, says Will Fraser, a third year professional communication student.

“I think the students are the ones that really lead the change, because as much resources and power as the administration has, they don’t have a direction to steer them in without the students leading,” said Fraser.

Ryerson has many student lead clubs and services that work towards equity, diversity and inclusion on campus. RyePRIDE, The Trans Collective and The Centre for Women and Trans People are only a few of the equity services offered on campus.

The Trans Collective recently spearheaded “The Bathroom Campaign”, in which gender-neutral washrooms were implemented on campus this year.

Evan Roy, a Trans Collective co-ordinator said the campaign “was created out of need within the community and we advocated out of that very obvious lack of access that was missing at Ryerson”.

While The Bathroom Campaign has been met with a lot of positive feedback, Roy also said signs have been torn down and defaced.

“We’re continuing to work on the campaign, because obviously some good work has been done, but not enough.”

Ryerson has a long history of battling homophobia and transphobia on campus. In 1981, a help hotline was set up due to the high number of homophobic assaults on campus. Through the years, LGBTQ student groups have had their posters torn down, their offices vandalized and banners stolen.

Similar to Fraser, Roy agrees that a lot is being done to “tear down things that are problematic and harmful,” however these things are happening because of Ryerson’s large activist community.

“A lot is being done at Ryerson but lets also realize that that work is on the backs of students,” said Roy.

Ryerson also has queer and transgender courses to ensure their students are educated on LGBTQ issues and feel properly represented. Ryerson’s newest course called queer media, taught by Andrea Houston from the school of journalism, examines how sexuality, sexual orientation and gender identity are portrayed in the media.

“I’m sure Ryerson has made mistakes in regards to it’s trans and non-binary students. I know the papers had their own growing pains in regards to sources, but you know that’s normal, as long as you learn from your mistakes and you try to do better,” said Houston.

Al Donato, a Ryerson journalism graduate expressed the importance of teaching proper terms to ensure LGBTQ students are being respected both in and outside the classroom.

“A lot of these terms aren’t normalized yet. If you don’t see these terms constantly like we do in our community, you’re just sort of like okay, I don’t know how to treat people with respect. So you just sort of wing it and you inevitably mess up,” Donato said.

RyePRIDE co-ordinator Megan Lewis acknowledges the progress Ryerson has made. “Initiatives are put forth by students and they are what drive increasing equity and inclusion on campus,” she said.

“However we have so much more work to be done until we actually reach equity, diversity and inclusion.”

Ryerson’s equity and inclusion based campus is all thanks to students, says Will Fraser, a third year professional communication student.

“I think the students are the ones that really lead the change, because as much resources and power as the administration has, they don’t have a direction to steer them in without the students leading,” said Fraser.

Ryerson has many student lead clubs and services that work towards equity, diversity and inclusion on campus. RyePRIDE, The Trans Collective and The Centre for Women and Trans People are only a few of the equity services offered on campus.

The Trans Collective recently spearheaded “The Bathroom Campaign”, in which gender-neutral washrooms were implemented on campus this year.

Evan Roy, a Trans Collective co-ordinator said the campaign “was created out of need within the community and we advocated out of that very obvious lack of access that was missing at Ryerson”.

While The Bathroom Campaign has been met with a lot of positive feedback, Roy also said signs have been torn down and defaced.

“We’re continuing to work on the campaign, because obviously some good work has been done, but not enough.”

Ryerson has a long history of battling homophobia and transphobia on campus. In 1981, a help hotline was set up due to the high number of homophobic assaults on campus. Through the years, LGBTQ student groups have had their posters torn down, their offices vandalized and banners stolen.

Similar to Fraser, Roy agrees that a lot is being done to “tear down things that are problematic and harmful,” however these things are happening because of Ryerson’s large activist community.

“A lot is being done at Ryerson but lets also realize that that work is on the backs of students,” said Roy.

Ryerson also has queer and transgender courses to ensure their students are educated on LGBTQ issues and feel properly represented. Ryerson’s newest course called queer media, taught by Andrea Houston from the school of journalism, examines how sexuality, sexual orientation and gender identity are portrayed in the media.

“I’m sure Ryerson has made mistakes in regards to it’s trans and non-binary students. I know the papers had their own growing pains in regards to sources, but you know that’s normal, as long as you learn from your mistakes and you try to do better,” said Houston.

Al Donato, a Ryerson journalism graduate expressed the importance of teaching proper terms to ensure LGBTQ students are being respected both in and outside the classroom.

“A lot of these terms aren’t normalized yet. If you don’t see these terms constantly like we do in our community, you’re just sort of like okay, I don’t know how to treat people with respect. So you just sort of wing it and you inevitably mess up,” Donato said.

RyePRIDE co-ordinator Megan Lewis acknowledges the progress Ryerson has made. “Initiatives are put forth by students and they are what drive increasing equity and inclusion on campus,” she said.

“However we have so much more work to be done until we actually reach equity, diversity and inclusion.”

A visual representation of the facts:

https://magic.piktochart.com/embed/18835723-lgbtq

A brief timeline of Ryerson’s LGBTQ pride history:

https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1CoSm4N7ZKaCRkKVKxTaEqARBlAJDytjVU9pEqdIBPzA&font=UnicaOne-Vollkorn&lang=en&initial_zoom=2&height=800

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Black Lives Matter

I am absolutely enraged as i write this post. Enraged because I have seen two lives taken in a matter of 48 hours. More specifically black lives. I am tired, as I’m sure many of us are of constantly seeing tragedy and seeing people’s lives being taken by those who vowed to serve and protect them. Is this protection? Firing four bullets into a man who was reaching for his wallet?

I am a white person, and as such I realize that I will never face the discrimination that people of colour are faced with each and every day. However I can empathize with them, as a human being I can recognize their struggles, their trials and tribulations. This empathy however is not as common as one would hope. The hash tag “Black Lives Matter” is continually met with retaliation hash tags such as “All Lives Matter” and “White Lives Matter”. This is not a time to tear down those who are in need of help, it is a time to liberate them. They are angry, and can you blame them? They continue to watch their people get murdered and for no good reason. This is a time to say BLACK LIVES MATTER, not all lives matter, not white lives matter, but BLACK LIVES MATTER. This does not mean that black lives are more important than the lives of others, it simply means their lives are in danger right now, and their lives are the ones we need to focus on saving. When Paris was attacked and the world banned together with the Message #PrayforParis, is was not countered by other hash tags. People realized there were other human beings in need and felt it was their job to help empower them. This is no different.  

To say race doesn’t play a role in these events is ignorant. When a black man is being detained  by two white officers, is shot multiple times and killed for no particular reason. While a white man rapes an unconscious woman and is sentenced to 3 months in prison, for fear that a longer sentence might have “serious effects on him”. Whites are getting slaps on the wrist and a stern warning and blacks are getting murdered. 

I began writing this post two days ago, after watching the video of Philando Castile’s death. Clearly I was very angry, I woke up in shock and disbelief that yet another life had been taken, only a day after we lost Alton Sterling. Yesterday I woke up angry once again, to the news that five white police officers were shot and killed and seven were wounded in Dallas, by a sniper. As I understand the anger many have towards the police force in the United States, murdering innocent officers is in no way just. Trying to stop blood shed with more blood shed is not the answer. These officers were innocent and un related to the deaths in the days prior, taken from their loved ones by a senseless act of violence, out of “revenge”. We need to aim for justice by ensuring officers who are killing people get the proper sentencing they deserve and are not left to walk free without facing the repercussions of their actions. This is justice. Killing innocent people to send a message is not. It is just as horrific as what we are speaking out against.

Rest in peace #PhilandoCastile #AltonSterling #BrentThompson  #PatrickZamarripa #MichaelKrol #MichaelSmith #LorneAhrens

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